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(Created page with "<div class="quote"> Code-Bravo wrote: <div class="quote">DecadeHansen wrote:<br /><div class="quote"> Code-Bravo wrote: They should re-name Mullenbachschleife to Sudschleife. ...")
 
 
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The Sudschleife would still be the main host of the German Motorcycle Grand Prix until there were plans for a Grand Prix Circuit in 1984. The Grand Prix Circuit would later be built on what was formerly the Sudschleife, which is the Nurburgring we know now.
 
The Sudschleife would still be the main host of the German Motorcycle Grand Prix until there were plans for a Grand Prix Circuit in 1984. The Grand Prix Circuit would later be built on what was formerly the Sudschleife, which is the Nurburgring we know now.
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For Spa, it started out as a very long road shaped like a triangle in 1920 until Eau Rouge was added in 1939. The Triangle would remain until the end of World War II, where some corners would be replaced (the Virage de Ancienne Douane would be cut short, thus giving birth to the Eau Rouge/Raidillon kink we know now, the chicanes were totally eliminated and would be a part of the Masta Straight).
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This circuit didn't last long until 1979 where the circuit was shortened to just 7 km and the start line moved from the Eau Rouge/Raidillon entrance to just between La Source and Blanchimont in 1981, which is then the Spa we know now.
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For Circuit de la Sarthe, it started out as a triangle connecting Mulsanne to the south, Arnage to the northwest, and Le Mans to the north.
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The circuit would go through a variety of changes, including a re-profiled Tertre Rouge, the addition of the Circuit Bugatti du Mans, and a shorter permanent circuit at barely 14 km if combined with the public roads of the past (this includes adding the Porsche Curves and the Ford Chicanes).
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Come 1990, the Mulsanne straight gets two chicanes to prevent cars going over 400 km/h on an almost 6 km straight, because FIA now prohibits a circuit with a straight of more than 1 mile long.
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The Porsche Curves, Ford Chicanes, Dunlop Curve, Dunlop Chicanes, and Tertre Rouge have since been re-profiled to add runoff areas for safer racing, which resulted in the Circuit des 24 Heures we know now.

Latest revision as of 09:47, June 13, 2017

Code-Bravo wrote:

DecadeHansen wrote:

Code-Bravo wrote: They should re-name Mullenbachschleife to Sudschleife.


Because that is what it is.

That's NOT what it is. The Sudschleife is the old south extended circuit portion of the Ring, while the Mullenbachschleife wasn't formed until the Nurburgring Grand Prix was established, where the Sudschleife had to be demolished for this to happen.

Alright, smarty pants, give me the FULL history of spa de francorchamps, nurburgring and circue de la sarthe, please.

The Sudschleife was originally a part of the Nordschleife back in the World War era when the ADAC Eifelrennen raced around the Eifel mountains, which was deemed very unsafe. Thus, the Nurburgring was born. and lots of races were held between World War I and World War II.

Racing resumed after WWII, where the Nordschelife would be the main venue for the German Grand Prix, but F1 cars had to take high risks on the Green Hell so a chicane was added before the start line.

The Sudschleife would still be the main host of the German Motorcycle Grand Prix until there were plans for a Grand Prix Circuit in 1984. The Grand Prix Circuit would later be built on what was formerly the Sudschleife, which is the Nurburgring we know now.

For Spa, it started out as a very long road shaped like a triangle in 1920 until Eau Rouge was added in 1939. The Triangle would remain until the end of World War II, where some corners would be replaced (the Virage de Ancienne Douane would be cut short, thus giving birth to the Eau Rouge/Raidillon kink we know now, the chicanes were totally eliminated and would be a part of the Masta Straight).

This circuit didn't last long until 1979 where the circuit was shortened to just 7 km and the start line moved from the Eau Rouge/Raidillon entrance to just between La Source and Blanchimont in 1981, which is then the Spa we know now.

For Circuit de la Sarthe, it started out as a triangle connecting Mulsanne to the south, Arnage to the northwest, and Le Mans to the north.

The circuit would go through a variety of changes, including a re-profiled Tertre Rouge, the addition of the Circuit Bugatti du Mans, and a shorter permanent circuit at barely 14 km if combined with the public roads of the past (this includes adding the Porsche Curves and the Ford Chicanes).

Come 1990, the Mulsanne straight gets two chicanes to prevent cars going over 400 km/h on an almost 6 km straight, because FIA now prohibits a circuit with a straight of more than 1 mile long.

The Porsche Curves, Ford Chicanes, Dunlop Curve, Dunlop Chicanes, and Tertre Rouge have since been re-profiled to add runoff areas for safer racing, which resulted in the Circuit des 24 Heures we know now.

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